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7 Ways To Engage People

Looking for some tips on really getting people engaged with what we do, I came across this great article by leadership expert Kevin Eidenberry. It’s so pertinent to the Savvy Team philosophy of teamwork that I just had to share it.

As Eidenberry says, engagement is a very trendy word, and while it is powerful, people are making it harder to understand and think about than is necessary. So to ‘engage’ people, let’s get to the heart of the matter. Let’s talk about what people really want in their lives. Because when they have these they will automatically and effortlessly be engaged in happily and effectively doing the work that’s required.

The following list won’t really surprise you, because it includes many of the things you want too.

Keep in mind that your people are people, and as individuals we certainly all want more of these things in both our personal lives and our work environment.

Remember when (and if) you provide them, engagement automatically ensues – so as leaders it’s your job to make sure you engage your people by ensuring that all seven of these things are obvious – because generally we are all much happier, more effective and co-operative when we get clarity about them!

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Jim Rohn: Income Seldom Exceeds Personal Development

As your business depends on YOU Inc. – you are the crucial factor in your success. The question is: “Do you want to develop your skills and knowledge within this booming industry, to achieve more than you currently are with perhaps less stress and effort?”

 

“Live as if you will die tomorrow, learn as if you would live forever” – Ghandi

Endless opportunities abound in this unlimited income vehicle, yet most people fail to ….

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12 Ways To Win Through Personal Responsibility

What is personal responsibility?

It is taking conscious control of your responses to the events and circumstances in your life. You are responsible for yourself whether you like it or not. What you do with your life and what you have done already is up to you. “Man must cease attributing his problems to his environment, and learn once again to exercise his will – his personal responsibility.” Albert Einstein

The ancient Romans understood the concept of personal responsibility. It’s said that after a Roman arch was completed, the engineer who built it had to stand underneath it when the scaffolding was removed.

Like discipline, responsibility is one of those words you have probably heard so many times from authority figures that you’ve developed a bit of an allergy to it. Still, it’s one of the most important things to grow and to feel good about your life. Without it you will never develop the attributes of a leader. Read More

Achieving Excellence

The question of what it takes to excel — to reach genius-level acumen at any chosen endeavour — has occupied psychologists for decades and philosophers for centuries. Groundbreaking research has pointed to “grit” as a better predictor of success than ‘IQ’, while leaders have admonished their people against the dangers of slipping into ‘autopilot’ in the quest for skill improvement.  Conscious competence means just that, if you want to improve results.

A new paper, by Brooke Macnamara, David Hambrick, and Frederick Oswald, offers a meta-analysis of existing literature on performance and practice, looking at 88 papers covering all the major realms where the practice-performance link has been studied. It finds that many have greatly overstated the importance of practice.

Practice, they found, on average explains just 12 percent of skill mastery and subsequent success. Instead, the factor identified as the main predictor of success is deliberate practice. Persistent training to which you give your full concentration rather than just your time, and usually and at best guided by a skilled expert, coach, or mentor. It’s a qualitative difference in how you pay attention, not a quantitative measure of clocking in the hours that creates mastery.

Mastery of any task has another component that exponentially increases results. Read More